Twitter Hashtag #

The # symbol, called a hashtag, is used to mark keywords or topics in a Tweet. It was created by Twitter users as a way to categorize messages into subjects, so they can be easily searched.  Now I get the simplicity of this, however, it seems to me a step backward.   Why can’t Twitter be “search smart”.  Shouldn’t they be able to “group and sort” messages based on context and replies and such, rather than require users to hashtag their content. I think its a bit complex to have users always type #hashtag or #rant, just for Twitter to be able to read such tags.  Maybe its because the message volume is simply overwhelming, or they’re giving users control over keywords in their Tweet content.  I suppose its no different than using the @ symbol to direct attention to a particular individual.  But the @ symbol at least means […]

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iOS NSString vs .NET String

Ok, its rather technical, forgive me for “geeking” out on you, but I love Objective C, but I really think, the NSString object is overly complex.  Some simple overrides (like those offered in C# with the String Class) would be very helpful. For those who don’t know, Objective C is the mainstay development language for Apple’s iOS, and C# widely popular on Microsoft .NET development platforms.  I get that Objective C is a purist object oriented language, but it goes way over the top on strings, using methods and operators that require verbose usage and operation. Lets compare: In .NET a simple string concatenation would be: [callout bg=”#00c5dc” color=”#ffffff”] String tempString = String.Empty; String tempStringa=”Hello”; String tempStringb = “There”; tempString = tempStringa + tempStringb; [/callout] The same thing now in Objective C using NSString [callout bg=”#00c5dc” color=”#ffffff”] NSString *tempString= @””; NSString *tempStringa= @”Hello”; NSString *tempStringb= @”There”; tempString = [tempStringa stringByAppendingString:tempStringb]; [/callout] Now I’m not […]

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